Generation Z – New forthcoming photographic exhibition at CAS & @AfrStudiesLib!

Read all about our new forthcoming photographic exhibition flowing through the third floor of the Alison Richard Building, the Centre of African Studies, and into the Library.

We are so excited to host Kerstin Hacker’s Generation Z this Michaelmas Term!

Advertisements

Alex uncovers further collections @AfrStudiesLib!

During my time volunteering at the African Studies Library I have had the privilege of getting to work with a variety of collections of primary sources, ranging from the personal correspondences of colonial administrators, to Cold War era intelligence reports on communist influence in Africa. While varying greatly in their contents, all the sources I have seen are able to offer insights not only into the lives of the individuals they relate to, but to wider society during their time period.

The first collection I got to work with was a prime example of this, a catalogue of letters written by and to one of the last British colonial administrators in Nigeria, John H. Smith. Reading through Smith’s correspondences with his Nigerian friends Dafuwa Azare and Edward George, I began to discover their thoughts on events taking place in Nigeria and around the world during the 1950s and 60s, and from their letters I developed an understanding of the situation on the ground in Nigeria shortly before and after its independence.

One of the most enjoyable aspects of working with previously uncatalogued collections of primary sources is discovering that they often contain a far broader range of documents than first meets the eye. This was the case with a collection of writings which, ostensibly all related to the engineer Eric Welbourn’s involvement with the foundation of the universities of Lagos and Ibadan. In fact, these documents formed only one part of the collection, which also contained a large number of 1930s intelligence reports from Northern Nigeria, donated by the pioneering Africanist Margery Perham. I was intrigued by how Perham came to obtain these once classified documents, and discovered that she gained them whilst travelling Africa as part of a Rockefeller Foundation Travel Scholarship. I was also surprised to discover that the Welbourn collection closely related to the collections of the renowned Arabist R.B. Serjeant, and the scholar and founder of Clare Hall Eric Ashby, whose writings I had already catalogued. It was greatly fulfilling to see these seemingly disparate sources transform into a cohesive story about the foundation and development of two of Nigeria’s largest universities.

Written sources have not been the only resource I have worked with at the ASC Library, the papers of Margery Perham and the French historian Guy Nicolas contained several maps, which helped to illustrate their work, and to visualise the contents of their writings.

Of all the collections I have worked with, my favourite must be that of the colonial administrator Harold Ingrams. In Ingrams’ collection I found a treasure trove of documents relating to the Cold War and the First World War. These included detailed analyses of communist influence in East Africa, plans to distribute anti-communist propaganda in Nigeria, and policy papers outlining the Foreign Office’s position on Portugal’s actions in Angola. One source I found particularly interesting was a 1918 Foreign Office report containing testimony from native leaders in the former German colonies of Namibia and Togo, who, unsurprisingly, denounced German rule and asked that the former German territories be placed under British ‘protection’. Documents like this remain highly open to interpretation, and it is possible view the report as either the sincere testimony of native populations who viewed British rule as their best option, or the cynical justification for an imperialistic land grab.

It is the questions which sources such as this raise which have helped to make my time at the African Studies Library so interesting, and it has been a great pleasure getting to see first-hand documents from Africa’s past and trying to find the answers to the questions they ask.  I have thoroughly enjoyed every moment of my time at the African Studies Library, and look forward to returning soon.

Alex C Aug 18

Alex had a work experience placement with us during August this year.  We thank him wholeheartedly for all of the hard work and his free time, and look forward to having him back during his final year at The Perse School. 

Migration Studies

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Migration Studies

From the Oxford University Press website for the journal:

Migration Studies is an international refereed, online only journal dedicated to advancing scholarly understanding of the determinants, processes and outcomes of human migration in all its manifestations. It furthers this aim by publishing original scholarship from around the world.

“Migration shapes human society and inspires ground-breaking research efforts across many different academic disciplines and policy areas. Migration Studies contributes to the consolidation of this field of scholarship, developing the core concepts that link different disciplinary perspectives on migration.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2013) to present.

Access Migration Studies via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

Image credit: “Migrant worker training” by ILO in Asia and the Pacific on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/Pf8oet

View original post

Trial access: Wiley Digital Archives

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge has trial access to the new Wiley Digital Archives platform on campus only via this link until 4 July 2018.

Please let us know what you think of this resource by writing to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you.

Wiley’s new Digital Archives offers access to the extensive archives of many of the societies Wiley currently works with to publish their content.  This is not journal backfile content but all of the records, letters, articles, photographs, data etc. that you would expect to find in such archives.

The initial digitizations are of the Royal  Anthropological Institute’s and the New York Academy of Science’s archives.

View original post

Library user? Win a £20 Heffers voucher!

If you are a user of the African Studies Library, please consider taking less than 3 minutes of your time to complete our summer survey.

We are always happy to hear comments and suggestions (good or bad!) from our users that can help us improve our services and collections.

The survey will close on Wednesday 20th June.

Complete the survey by clicking on the link, or the image below: 

It’s feedback time!

Summer_survey_2018_jing

If you leave your Cambridge University email address at the end of the survey you will be in with a chance of winning a £20 Heffers voucher!

A winner will be picked at random on Wednesday 20th June

We look forward to receiving your feedback!

New ebooks – May 2018

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the 83 titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during May. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.

Arts & Humanities

AMES1  Phil1  AMES2  Div1  MML1  MML2  AMES3  MML3  Film1  Perf1  Engl1  Engl2

Humanities & Social Sciences

Anth1  Educ1  Geog1  Hist1  POLIS1  SAS1  Sust1  Educ3  Geog2  POLIS2  Educ4  Geog3  POLIS3  Sust2  Educ5  Geog4  POLIS4  Educ6  POLIS5 POLIS6  Crim1  HPS1

Science, Engineering and Medicine

Eng2  Med1  Sust2  Eng3

Business & Management

Bus2  Bus1  Bus3  Bus4   

View original post

Duke University Press: new ebooks for 2018

ebooks@cambridge

Raymond Knapp traces the musical legacy of German Idealism as it led to the declining prestige of composers such as Haydn while influencing the development of American popular music in the nineteenth century, in Making Light: Haydn, Musical Camp, and the Long Shadow of German Idealism, published recently by Duke University Press.        making light

Knapp identifies in Haydn and in early popular American musical cultures such as minstrelsy and operetta a strain of high camp—a mode of engagement that relishes both the superficial and serious aspects of an aesthetic experience—that runs antithetical to German Idealism’s musical paradigms. Making Light is just one of 35 new titles published so far in 2018, now available on the Duke University Press Books platform for University of Cambridge registered users, thanks to continued funding by the University Library. Click on the covers below to view the full text of some of these titles in subjects…

View original post 158 more words

Intersentia and Wits University Press books available on Cambridge Core

ebooks@cambridge

Publishing banner

Cambridge Universty Press have partnered with the following two publishing houses in 2018:

Intersentia iconIntersentia Ltd is an independent and rapidly developing international publishing house based in Cambridge, UK. The Intersentia list covers private and public law, as well as the criminal law of different jurisdictions, European Union law, comparative law, international law and human rights. They publish academic, professional, and educational monographs and edited collections.

Wits University Press iconWits University Press was established in 1922. As the oldest university press in South Africa, it is strategically placed at the crossroads of African and global knowledge production and dissemination. It is highly regarded for the high quality and progressive content of its publications, as well as it’s increasingly broadening author base, including researchers from across Africa.

Intersentia and Wits University Press ebooks are hosted alongside tens of thousands of other partner press and Cambridge University Press titles on Cambridge Core and the titles are…

View original post 130 more words

New ebooks – March and April 2018 double issue

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the 177 titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during March and April. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.

Arts & Humanities

Arch1  AMES1  Div1  Engl1  MML1  AMES2  Engl2  Arch2  MML2  AMES3  Eng3  MML3  MML4  MML5

Humanities & Social Sciences

Econ1  Educ1  Hist1  HPS1  POLIS1  Soc1  Soc2  Soc3  Soc4  Educ2  Educ3  Hist2  Hist3  Soc6  Educ4  Educ5  Hist4  LatAm1  POLIS2 Soc7  Soc8  SAS1

Sciences & Medicine

Physics1  MatSoc1  Med1  Psych1

Business & Engineering

Engineering  Business  Business2  Business3  Business4  Business5

View original post

FT.com for the Cambridge reader

ejournals@cambridge

Cambridge University Library and the Marshall Library of Economics are delighted to announce that all University of Cambridge members now have access, both within the University and from anywhere in the world, to the Financial Times online direct via the FT‘s website, FT.com.

The Financial Times is the world’s premier newspaper for business and economics.

The FT.com can be accessed on campus direct to https://www.ft.com or off campus via Raven (Shibboleth Single Sign-On) using this link.

Links to the FT.com can be found on the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z, the LibGuide for Newspapers, and via iDiscover.

To get the most out of your access, create an account on FT.com by clicking the “Sign in” link on the FT.com site.  Cambridge users can enter their cam.ac.uk email address and create an account.  After creating your account you can access your FT.com

View original post 115 more words