New ebooks – August 2019

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during August. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

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Maps: Who’d have known they could be so interesting?

Michael Korda once said that “the whole attraction of writing history” is that it allows you to explore the unknown and therefore should be treated as “a journey without maps”. However, having worked closely with maps over the past few weeks, I would contend that they are in fact key to this historical journey, revealing much about the nature and challenges faced by the societies in which they were produced.

The Centre of African Studies Library is lucky enough to possess around 250 maps, all of which have now been documented and archived. Having access to such an extensive map collection is rare and affords us the opportunity to gain a unique insight into African societies and their history. Maps allow for a variety of issues to be examined, whether economic, social, cultural, political, climatic or geological in nature, and at different scales. Similarly, understanding the agendas and methods of the cartographers and publishing agencies who produce these maps can also reveal much about the attitudes and development of the wider society to which they belong. As such, the importance of maps to historical, political and sociological study cannot be underestimated.

In fact, many modern-day political issues are intrinsically linked to maps and boundaries. Ongoing border and identity disputes throughout Africa, for example the Anglophone Crisis in Cameroon, often stem back to the infamous Berlin Conference of 1884-85, when African lands were arbitrarily divided along rivers and mountain ranges (or even just by straight-lines) without a consideration of tribal, ethnic or cultural boundaries.

As you would expect, there is a distinctly colonial focus to many of the maps and as such, they often express haughty attitudes towards Africa. This is epitomised by the attempts of renowned cartographer Herman Moll to depict Africa “according to ye newest and most exact observations” (this map is a 1745 reprint of his original map published in 1710). Not only does he use archaic terms such as ‘Negroland’ (to describe West Africa) but also, through textual commentary, emphasises the superiority of white settlers around Guinea who “wear Cloths, and have ye use of Letters, make Silk, &  … keep the Christian Sabbath” and who are “a different kind of People from the Blacks”. He also marks out potential commercial interests such as gold, ivory and slave coasts, believing the British to possess natural rights over this property.

Moll map

“Ethnic” and “tribal migration” maps from British Somaliland (as with the map below) and the Ivory Coast also exemplify the implications of colonialism for the indigenous peoples. Settler colonisation often meant that local peoples were displaced, either by a process of violent depopulation, or cultural assimilation. Through using these maps, we can examine such migration patterns and in doing so ascertain both the scale and nature of this displacement.

Tribal migration map

However, the maps also enlighten us as to other social customs and challenges affecting Africa which exist autonomously from colonial narratives and issues. The map below highlights the issue of tsetse fly infestation in the Bechuanaland Protectorate. These flies, which reside predominantly in South-East Africa, are vectors of African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), a disease, which left untreated, is often fatal. It has been responsible for many tragedies throughout history, for example the 1901 epidemic in Uganda, whereby 250,000 people (approximately 2/3 of the population of the affected lakeshore area) died. In the absence of available and effective medicine, the map (dated 1960) reveals alternative ways in which the issue was managed by the authorities, marking out areas for woodland to either be felled or ring-barked, so as to destroy the natural habitat of the fly and therefore attempt to cull its population.

Tsetse fly map

The territorial ownership and land dispute map of an unidentified Nigerian village (below), dating back to 1929, gives an interesting insight into comparatively local challenges and how they were managed. Hand drawn by one R.M. Prempeh, whose surname suggests West African heritage, the map marks out the names of people who “alone enjoy [each] portion” of land and also communal areas, in doing so settling issues regarding disputed possession. Not only is the hand-drawn style of the map unique and endearing, but it shows a firm sense of order and a clear moral code being administered in local villages without any need for colonial intervention or enforcement, refuting the notions of Europeans such as Moll (above) that Africans were in any way ‘uncivilised’.

Land dispute map

Completing this project has been both rewarding and extremely interesting. As someone who is hoping to study history in the future, examining these maps has given me a new way to engage with the past, using cues and nuances from them to generate interest in and instigate research into the wider historical context. Having studied maps from colonies such as the Ivory Coast and Senegal, I have even managed to learn some French! As such, I would recommend anyone with an interest in African history to come to the Centre and explore this fascinating collection.

Sam Hughes is entering his final year at Perse School, and volunteered with us here at the Centre for 2 weeks

 

New ebooks – July 2019

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during July. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

Humanities & Social Sciences

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New ebooks – March 2019

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during March. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

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JSTOR Security Studies: trial access

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access is now enabled until 30 April 2019 to the new JSTOR Security Studies collection via this link:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/security-studies/

Please send your feedback on this resource via the form here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials-feedback-form

JSTOR Security Studies is an evolving collection of multi-content resources focusing on violence and conflict in international relations. The scope of the collection encompasses cyber security, foreign policy, human security, intelligence & espionage, international law, military studies, peace & conflict studies, and political violence & terrorism. The core collection, when finished, will include:

  • 75 scholarly journals, military journals, trade journals, and defense newsletters.
  • 10 Open Access journals
  • Up to 20,000 (grey literature) reports from 100 think tanks from all over the world

Collection Highlights

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SCOLMA Conference 2019

SCOLMA Logo

SCOLMA CONFERENCE 2019

 Decolonising African Studies: questions and dilemmas for libraries, archives and collections

Monday, 10 June 2019, University of Edinburgh

Appleton Tower 2.12, 11 Crichton Street, Edinburgh EH8 9LE

 

Programme

9.00                Introductions

9.05–10.20    Panel 1 – Decolonising library collections

Jenni Skinner, Mehves Dignum and Clara Panozzo Zénere (Cambridge University)

‘Decolonising library collections and practices at Cambridge University’

 Justin Cox (African Books Collective) and Stephanie Kitchen (International African Institute)

‘African Books Collective: African published books for the North’

Gerard van Der Bruinhorst (African Studies Centre Library, University of Leiden)

‘On rape and revenge: reading Peggy Oppong’s “Red heifer” against the decolonisation of African Studies collections’

10.20–10.45   Coffee

10.45–12.15   Panel 2 – Decolonisation and archives in Southern Africa

Mathias Fubah Alubafi (Human Sciences Research Council)

‘The HSRC Archives (1929–1968) in a changing South Africa’

Ken Chisa (University of KwaZulu-Natal)

‘Decolonising indigenous knowledge (IK) in South African archives: can policy learn from practice?

 Livingstone Muchefa (National Archives of Zimbabwe) tbc

‘The archivist and the scholar: re-interpretation and re-location of colonial archives’

12.15–13.30  Lunch & AGM 

13.30–15.00  Panel 3 – Archival histories and migrations

James Lowry (Liverpool University Centre for Archive Studies)

‘Repatriation is decolonisation’

 Fabienne Chameleot (University of Portsmouth)

‘Splitting the colonial archives in half: archival expertise and decolonisation in West Africa, 1958–1960’

Isabelle Dion (Archives nationales d’outre-mer, France)

‘French decolonisation and archives’ (this paper will be delivered in French)

15.00–15.30  Tea

15.30–17.00  Panel 4 – Working with heritage collections

 Ahmed Hussein Abdelrahman Adam (University of Khartoum) tbc

‘Sudanese collections in the UK: current situation and challenges’          

 Joanne Davis

‘Accessing UK archival holdings from Africa’

 Chimwemwe Phiri tbc

‘Unearthing new meanings: a decolonial framework for accessing and translating the Africa colonial archive at the Weston Library, University of Oxford’

17.00–18.00  Round table

The round table will provide an opportunity to discuss some of the issues raised during the conference in relation to the collections of major libraries and archives in the UK and internationally.

SCOLMA thanks ECAS, the University of Edinburgh, ASAUK and Taylor & Francis for their support of the conference.

This programme is subject to change.

Conference fee £50 (£30 unwaged) to include tea/coffee and lunch. To book a place contact Sarah Rhodes (sarah.rhodes@bodleian.ox.ac.uk).

Europresse

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge now provides access to the news media of continental Europe and beyond

Through a new subscription to EUROPRESSE members of the University now have access to a wide range of European newspapers, including the French national and regional press (e.g. Le Monde, Le Figaro), news magazines, the international press (New York Times, Guardian, and many more), professional publications, news agencies, and TV and radio transcriptions.

Access is restricted to 2 concurrent users – please remember to log out from your session. If you are unable to gain access – il vous faudra patienter un peu.

Access is available on or off campus via the following link:-

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=https://nouveau.europresse.com/access/ip/default.aspx?un=U031883T_1

Thematically, Europresse titles cover the Humanities and Social Sciences, Politics, Law, Economics, Finance, Science, Environment, IT, Transports, Industry, Energy, Agriculture, Arts and culture (Lire, Le Magazine littéraire, World Literature Today, Télérama

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Cambridge Elements; “a dynamic reference resource for graduate students, researchers and practitioners”

ebooks@cambridge

Back in May 2018 the ebooks@cambridge team first posted about the then newly emerging Cambridge University Press Elements titles. This publishing programme has now officially launched and the amount of available titles are steadily increasing, with 76 Elements now hosted and accessible on Cambridge Core and searchable in iDiscover.

Cambridge Elements are a new concept in academic publishing and scholarly communication, combining the best features of books and journals. They consist of original, concise, authoritative, and peer-reviewed scholarly and scientific research, organised into focused series edited by leading scholars, and provide comprehensive coverage of the key topics in disciplines spanning the arts and sciences. This innovative format takes just 12 weeks to publish, and the born-digital titles are between 40-75 pages long. There are over 70 series already under contract, with another 30 in the planning stages. Two hundred titles are expected to be published in 2019, and CUP expect…

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New ebooks – February 2019

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during February. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

View original post 208 more words

Immigrations, Migrations and Refugees: Global Perspectives, 1941-1996: trial access

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge has trial access to the digital archive Immigrations, Migrations and Refugees: Global Perspectives, 1941-1996 here:

https://ezp.lib.cam.ac.uk/login?url=http://infoweb.newsbank.com/apps/readex/welcome?p=TOPIMM

Access is available from 1 to 31 March 2019.

Please send your feedback on this trial using this online form.  Thank you.

From the beginning of World War II through the end of the twentieth century, the mass movement of peoples caused problems for governments around the world. Responses to legal immigration, illegal immigration, and refugee crises varied greatly, often depending on a country’s proximity to the crisis. These problems and responses helped shape the world we live in.

What is the context of this database?

This database contains news reports, television transcripts, and radio transcripts from around the world. The reports were chosen by a U.S. government agency called the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS)—which became part of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in 1947–to be disseminated among government…

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