Jisc geospatial data gives academics access to millions of open data maps

ejournals@cambridge

Re-posted from Jisc News.

Integration of Airbus’ Vision-1 satellite imagery and the GeoSeer search tool give students and academics access to millions of open access geographical data sets

Jisc is pleased to announce the launch of the improved Jisc geospatial data service providing universities and colleges easy and free access to more than 1.6 million geographical datasets from around the world, including the most comprehensive index of maps ever brought together.

The service features the implementation of a new search tool, GeoSeer, and the access to Airbus’ Vision-1 satellite imagery.

The Jisc service brings open data and licensed data together in one interface, integrating GeoSeer which can search for spatial data by location and subject. It also offers the opportunity to review multiple search results at once by overlaying any of the datasets to study and compare changes in the landscape over time.

Phil Brownnett, head of UK…

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New ebooks – October 2019

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during October. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

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Journal of Resistance Studies

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Resistance Studies

From the  website for the journal:

Journal of Resistance Studies is a new international, interdisciplinary and peer-reviewed scientific journal that explores unarmed resistance. The articles we want to publish focus on critical understandings of resistance strategies, discourses, tactics, effects, causes, contexts and experiences. Our aim is to advance an understanding of how resistance might undermine repression, injustices and domination of any kind, as well as how resistance might nurture autonomous subjectivity, as e.g. constructive work, alternative communities, oppositional ways of thinking.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2015) to present.

Access Journal of Resistance Studies via the Journal Search or from the iDiscover record.

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Manchester Film Studies

ebooks@cambridge

Manchester Film Studiesis a growing collection of currently163 books written by leading names in the field as well as one journal: Film Studies. It covers all aspects of film studies from volumes on a wide range of British, French, Spanish and Latin American filmmakers to debates and issues that are informing current practice in film and screen studies.

This collection aims to help readers develop an understanding of how film engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, placing films in their historical context as well as covering current debates and future challenges for cinema as a medium. Manchester Film Studies will enable readers to explore many aspects of theoretical and historical film studies as well as critical approaches to classical and contemporary films.

Thanks to a collaborative purchase between the Modern and Medieval Languages and Linguistics Faculty Library, the Connell Fund and ebooks@cambridge, members of Cambridge…

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Trial access: Sustainable Development Goals Online

ebooks@cambridge

Trial access is now enabled up to the 20th December 2019, to Sustainable Development Goals Online.

From the website: “The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals is by any standards, an ambitious programme, requiring international and trans-national collaboration by governments, businesses, NGO and citizens. The prize is a large one – make the world a better place in 2030 than it was when the programme was started, across 17 important areas.”

The platform offers “an interdisciplinary collection of digital content, including Taylor & Francis’ books and journals across all disciplines, themed around the SDGs. SDGO includes more than 12,000 carefully selected articles and chapters in an online library covering the 17 SDGs, plus teaching and learning materials including presentations, videos, case studies, teaching guides, and lesson plans.”

The Goals

Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote…

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New ebooks – September 2019

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during September. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

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New e-resources pages on search and discovery tools

ejournals@cambridge

New pages on search and discovery tools have been added to the e-resources website.   These pages are intended to promote discovery of Open Access content and provide links and guidance to help users when they meet a subscription paywall.

The pages can be access here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/search-and-discovery-tools

and are linked from the top-left box on the e-resources site.

The pages replace the “Articles and journals” page.

The iDiscover article search box has been moved to the first concertina box on the “Ask Cambridge Libraries” page.

There is also now linked from this page an iDiscover “Citation Linker” for article searching using ISSN, Title, DOI or PMID (or ISBN for books).

The pages comprise:

Open Access browser plugins

Super-easy to install and use, we recommend extensions to your browser to deliver the articles you need

Where to find Open Access content

Guiding you to the…

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New ebooks – August 2019

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during August. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

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Maps: Who’d have known they could be so interesting?

Michael Korda once said that “the whole attraction of writing history” is that it allows you to explore the unknown and therefore should be treated as “a journey without maps”. However, having worked closely with maps over the past few weeks, I would contend that they are in fact key to this historical journey, revealing much about the nature and challenges faced by the societies in which they were produced.

The Centre of African Studies Library is lucky enough to possess around 250 maps, all of which have now been documented and archived. Having access to such an extensive map collection is rare and affords us the opportunity to gain a unique insight into African societies and their history. Maps allow for a variety of issues to be examined, whether economic, social, cultural, political, climatic or geological in nature, and at different scales. Similarly, understanding the agendas and methods of the cartographers and publishing agencies who produce these maps can also reveal much about the attitudes and development of the wider society to which they belong. As such, the importance of maps to historical, political and sociological study cannot be underestimated.

In fact, many modern-day political issues are intrinsically linked to maps and boundaries. Ongoing border and identity disputes throughout Africa, for example the Anglophone Crisis in Cameroon, often stem back to the infamous Berlin Conference of 1884-85, when African lands were arbitrarily divided along rivers and mountain ranges (or even just by straight-lines) without a consideration of tribal, ethnic or cultural boundaries.

As you would expect, there is a distinctly colonial focus to many of the maps and as such, they often express haughty attitudes towards Africa. This is epitomised by the attempts of renowned cartographer Herman Moll to depict Africa “according to ye newest and most exact observations” (this map is a 1745 reprint of his original map published in 1710). Not only does he use archaic terms such as ‘Negroland’ (to describe West Africa) but also, through textual commentary, emphasises the superiority of white settlers around Guinea who “wear Cloths, and have ye use of Letters, make Silk, &  … keep the Christian Sabbath” and who are “a different kind of People from the Blacks”. He also marks out potential commercial interests such as gold, ivory and slave coasts, believing the British to possess natural rights over this property.

Moll map

“Ethnic” and “tribal migration” maps from British Somaliland (as with the map below) and the Ivory Coast also exemplify the implications of colonialism for the indigenous peoples. Settler colonisation often meant that local peoples were displaced, either by a process of violent depopulation, or cultural assimilation. Through using these maps, we can examine such migration patterns and in doing so ascertain both the scale and nature of this displacement.

Tribal migration map

However, the maps also enlighten us as to other social customs and challenges affecting Africa which exist autonomously from colonial narratives and issues. The map below highlights the issue of tsetse fly infestation in the Bechuanaland Protectorate. These flies, which reside predominantly in South-East Africa, are vectors of African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), a disease, which left untreated, is often fatal. It has been responsible for many tragedies throughout history, for example the 1901 epidemic in Uganda, whereby 250,000 people (approximately 2/3 of the population of the affected lakeshore area) died. In the absence of available and effective medicine, the map (dated 1960) reveals alternative ways in which the issue was managed by the authorities, marking out areas for woodland to either be felled or ring-barked, so as to destroy the natural habitat of the fly and therefore attempt to cull its population.

Tsetse fly map

The territorial ownership and land dispute map of an unidentified Nigerian village (below), dating back to 1929, gives an interesting insight into comparatively local challenges and how they were managed. Hand drawn by one R.M. Prempeh, whose surname suggests West African heritage, the map marks out the names of people who “alone enjoy [each] portion” of land and also communal areas, in doing so settling issues regarding disputed possession. Not only is the hand-drawn style of the map unique and endearing, but it shows a firm sense of order and a clear moral code being administered in local villages without any need for colonial intervention or enforcement, refuting the notions of Europeans such as Moll (above) that Africans were in any way ‘uncivilised’.

Land dispute map

Completing this project has been both rewarding and extremely interesting. As someone who is hoping to study history in the future, examining these maps has given me a new way to engage with the past, using cues and nuances from them to generate interest in and instigate research into the wider historical context. Having studied maps from colonies such as the Ivory Coast and Senegal, I have even managed to learn some French! As such, I would recommend anyone with an interest in African history to come to the Centre and explore this fascinating collection.

Sam Hughes is entering his final year at Perse School, and volunteered with us here at the Centre for 2 weeks

 

New ebooks – July 2019

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a taster of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during July. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

A complete list of ebook purchases is available to Cambridge library staff to download from the ebooks@cambridge section of the Cambridge Libraries Intranet.

All of the titles can be found in iDiscover. Alternatively, follow the title links below the cover images for access.

Arts & Humanities

Humanities & Social Sciences

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