Journal for Islamic Studies

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : journal for islamic studies

Image by Alex Proimos from flickr

From the  journal website:

“The Journal for Islamic Studies (JIS) is committed to the publication of original research on Islam as a world culture and civilization. We therefore hope to stimulate and publish research that relates to religion, theology and law.

At the same time, it is also our goal to cover the disciplines of history, culture, art, ethics, politics, international relations, philosophy, history of religions, anthropology and sociology in the variety of ways in which these relate to the world of Islam in its broadest sense. Comparative studies of societies, as well as research with an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary focus, are strongly encouraged.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 27 (2007) to present.

Access Journal for Islamic Studies via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

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Global Jukebox

ejournals@cambridge

The Global Jukebox offers access to more than 6000 recordings from around the globe that can now be streamed freely online.

“The Global Jukebox is presented as a free, non-commercial, educational place for everybody, students, educators, scholars, scientists, musicians, dancers, linguists, artists and music fans to explore expressive patterns in their cultural-geographic and diasporic settings and alongside other people’s. By inviting familiarity with many kinds of vocalizing, musicking, moving, and talking, we hope to advance cultural equity and to reconnect people and communities with their creative heritage.”

Search the database with the map or on the ‘tree’, searching by region or cultural group. Clicking on these images will take you though to the website.

Further details on Global Jukebox can be found in this New York times article from April 18th 2017:

“Alan Lomax made it his lifelong mission to archive and share traditional music from around the world. He…

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Oxford Handbooks Online for 2017

ebooks@cambridge

OHO image

The ebooks@cambridge service is pleased to announce the purchase of the 2017 Oxford Handbooks Online collections in twelve subject areas across Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. This purchase adds to the considerable backfile of Handbooks already available to the Cambridge community via the Oxford Handbooks Online platform, and has been funded by the UL’s English Collections budget and the Squire Law Library.

The twelve subjects covered are: Archaeology, Classical Studies, Economics & Finance, History, Law, Linguistics, Literature, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology and Religion. As content within the 2017 collections is published, it will become immediately available to Cambridge users on the Oxford Handbooks Online platform. Here are a few  2017 titles that are already available – click on the covers for authenticated access:

Archaeology1  Classics1  Economics1  Law1  Linguistics1  Literature1  Music1  Philosophy1

To find out more about Oxford Handbooks, ‘the world’s most trusted source for scholarly research reviews’, see…

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Historical Texts trial

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access is now enabled to the Historical Texts platform until 31 May 2017 via the following link:

http://historicaltexts.jisc.ac.uk/

Historical Texts brings together Early English Books Online (EEBO), Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) and 65,000 texts from the British Library 19th Century collection.

Via this platform is also included the UK Medical Heritage Library collection (UKMHL) which is Open Access and accessible here.

The main purpose of this trial is to review the appropriateness of the platform for Cambridge users.  An overview of the collections included in the platform can be foundhere.  Note that Cambridge currently has access to EEBO and ECCO on separate (publisher) platforms, but not to the British Library 19th Century collection.

You can contact the Historical Texts platform directly via email (historicaltexts@jisc.ac.uk) during the trial for any queries.

Please send your feedback on the trial to rarebooks@lib.cam.ac.uk

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Semitica et Classica

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Semitica et classica.

From the Brepols website for the journal:

“Semitica et Classica,  International Journal of Oriental and Mediterranean Studies, led by specialists in Eastern Mediterranean studies, philologists, archaeologists, epigraphists, philosophers, historians and linguists is directed to researchers with a particular interest in these areas of learning. The journal publishes work related to the interaction between the classical and Oriental worlds from the second millennium B.C.E. to the early centuries of Islam. The cultural area covered by the journal stretches from the western Mediterranean to the Middle East and includes Europe, Africa, and Asia up to and including the Arabian peninsula.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2008) to present.

Access Semitica et Classica via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

Image credit: ‘Image 0096’ by Richard Kendall on Flickr – https://flic.kr/p/79QRVG

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Trial access to online resources for LGBT+ studies

ejournals@cambridge

The University Library has arranged trial access to online resources for LGBT+ studies: the Archives of Sexuality and Gender (Gale Cengage) and LTBT Life with Full Text (Ebsco).

Archives of Sexuality and Gender can be accessed from this link until 5 June 2017

Archives of Sexuality and Gender is an ongoing, growing series of archives comprising primary sources in LGBTQ history and activism, cultural studies, psychology, sociology, health, political science, policy studies, human rights, gender studies, and more.  To date only Part I has been released: “LGBTQ History and Culture since 1940, Part I”. This collection presents important aspects of LGBTQ life in the second half of the twentieth century and beyond and illuminates the experiences not just of the LGBTQ community as a whole, but of individuals of different races, ethnicities, ages, religions, political orientations, and geographical locations that constitute this community. Historical records of political and social organizations…

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World Literature Today

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : World Literature Today.


From the JSTOR website for the journal:

“World Literature Today, the University of Oklahoma’s bimonthly magazine of international literature and culture, opens a window to the world in every issue. Spanning the globe, WLT features lively essays, original poetry and fiction, coverage of transnational issues and trends, author profiles and interviews, book reviews, travel writing, and coverage of the other arts, culture, and politics as they intersect with literature. Now in its ninth decade of continuous publication, WLT has been recognized by the Nobel Prize committee as one of the “best edited and most informative literary publications” in the world, and was recently called “an excellent source of writings from around the globe by authors who write as if their lives depend on it” (Utne Reader, 2005). WLT has received a dozen national publishing awards in the past ten years, including the Phoenix Award…

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The Dr Audrey Richards’ pamphlet collection – as detailed by Ophelia, volunteer @AfrStudiesLib

From the start, the huge amount of knowledge contained in the Audrey Richards’ donation boxes was obvious. As a new volunteer at the Centre of African Studies Library, I felt impressed (and a little bit nervous) when I first saw these papers, results of long years of research, and many different collaborations. In other words, it was a truly honorary pleasure to get to touch what I had in front of me and to discover Audrey Richards’ centres of interests.

The papers had to be listed and, if it was tricky at the beginning, I have to say I had the time of my life with these five boxes (Patrick Swayze was sadly elsewhere). Little by little, I felt I started to discover Dr. Audrey Richards, not only as the scientist we know within her books and research, but the person too : a person, with her very own interests and passions who kept for years papers and books which were sent to her. Going over her donation boxes made me feel special in a particular way, it was a chance to get to know someone who did so much in her life without even talking to her. It was like a big puzzle, and I wanted to gradually add its pieces. So yes, I was twitchy when I first started to open these boxes ; I was twitchy because I didn’t want to make any mistakes ; I was twitchy because eh, I was (and still am) a newbie so it was likely I would do something wrong. It took me some time, it took me some books, it took me some papers, to really understand what was going on and what I had in my hands. I was not meant to be an archives factory ; I was meant to see, to touch, to read and – most important – to enjoy that.

The first box I needed to catalogue was called MS RICH 2 (MS RICH 1 was fortuitously found soon after that). This box, along with the previous one, was an anthology of everything that didn’t really fit in the other boxes. From a chapter about Marriage in Northern Rhodesia to an article around Witchcraft and Sorcery, I think I had little stars in my eyes by the end of the day. What was brilliant was the diversity contained in one simple cardboard box; some papers were with annotations, some not, some were written in English, some were written in French… Two other boxes, South Africa and East Africa, were more structured in their composition as they were consolidated around specific parts of Africa. But fear not, they were as diversified as the first ones, touching a lot of different subjects (political, social, cultural). Another box, the last one, was called General ; although there were not any specific locations, all the articles and papers found inside were about customs and social systems.

Then, I had to write a short biography about Dr. Audrey Richards and had the opportunity to meet Dr. Ray Abrahams who knew her personally. I had the opportunity to go through his own boxes of donated materials and my very first “impressed-feeling” came back quickly. Meeting such a great Anthropological figure gave me goosebumps (and my cheeks were certainly blushing a bit).

Being a Volunteer at the Centre for African Studies Library is honestly the best professional experience I’ve ever had. It has given me the feeling of being part of something bigger, to help students and researchers by providing them with more resources.  Volunteering has given me more focus in my career path, and I think that everybody should have at least a taste of this great experience.

ophelia

Ophélia Labardacq is a volunteer at the African Studies Library, she will start an internship at the Schlumberger Institute in August, alongside starting her Masters in Library & Information Management at Sheffield.

For more information on this archive collection, visit the “Featured Archive Collection” box on our LibGuide.

 

New ebooks – April 2017

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a selection of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during April. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

Click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.

Business1   Classics1  Economics1  Education1  Engineering3  English1  History1  HPS1  Italian1  Land1  Law1  Music1  Politics1  SPS1  AMES1  Computer1  Economics2  Education2  Education3  Education4  English2  HistArt1  HistArt2  Land2  Politics2Politics3   Business2  Education5    Education6     HistArt3  Politics4  Italian2   Economics3  Education7  HistArt4  Politics5

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