History of Humanities

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : History of Humanities.

From the University of Chicago Press website for the journal:

History of Humanities, along with the newly formed Society for the History of the Humanities, takes as its subject the history of a wide variety of disciplines including archaeology, art history, historiography, linguistics, literary studies, musicology, philology, and media studies, tracing these fields from their earliest developments, through their formalization into university disciplines, and to the modern day.

“By exploring the history of humanities across time and civilizations and along with their socio-political and epistemic implications, the journal takes a critical look at the concept of humanities itself.”

Now available to the University of Cambridge electronically from volume 1 (2016) to present.

Access History of Humanities via the ejournals@cambridge A-Z or at this link.

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How to get free (and legal) access to journal articles behind paywalls: the Open Access Button

A.G. Leventis Library & Information Services

I’m sure all of you engaged in research will be familiar with messages such as this:

paywall

It’s an example of what you see when you are trying to access a journal article and hit what’s known as a paywall. If you’re lucky, your institution has paid for a subscription: you log in and voila! The PDF appears! If you’re not so lucky, you might feel stumped and as if the only way to read the article is to pay the requested cost.

But, this isn’t necessarily the case? Did you know that usually authors are entitled to make a free version of the article available via their institution? If you’ve ever come to me asking for an article you can only find behind a paywall and I email you back a PDF in 5 minutes, it’s most likely that this is the version I’ve found.

So now you want…

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Trial access to Exact Editions

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access is now available to the magazine titles published by Exact Editionswhich comprise the entirety of the back issues online.  Access is available until 11 October 2017 at the following URL:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.exacteditions.com/iplogin

Mobile users can also download the ‘Exactly’ app on an iOS or Android device from the relevant app store, and instantly access every title.

Some of the titles Exact Editions features are described below.  They are quite mixed in terms of communities of interest, and range from the creative arts industries to contemporary politics and business, so please inform your users as you think appropriate.  A full list of the titles accessible in this trial can be examined in this sheet.

Please tell us about your impressions of this resource/the title(s) by writing to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Your feedback will inform whether or not we take this resource any further forward.  Thank you

Dazed & Confused

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New e-resource: Global Health database

ejournals@cambridge

The Medical Library and the University Library have arranged access for the University to the Global Health database, aka CABI Global Health.

Access is available for 4 users simultaneously.   Once you have finished using the database please log out of it.

Global Health is available via this link or via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z

Produced by CABI, this database was created to ensure that key literature from all sources can be brought quickly and easily to the attention of those working in the field. The database covers all aspects of public health at both international and community levels, as well as a wealth of material from other biomedical and life science fields.

A promotional flyer is available here to help promote this resource in your library.

Global Health is the only specialized bibliographic, abstracting and indexing database dedicated to public health, completing the picture of international medical…

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Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition

ebooks@cambridge

CMS blog

To paraphrase the words of the Chicago Manual of Style team, on Monday 21st August two rare events were celebrated in the US: a solar eclipse and the unveiling of the new Chicago Manual of Style Online.

ebooks@cambridge is pleased to announce that current staff and students of the University now have access to the new 17th edition, on and off-campus, via iDiscover or directly via this link.

About the Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is a style guide for American English, published by University of Chicago Press, prescribing writing and citation styles widely used in publishing. The Chicago citation style is also recommended to students by a number of Cambridge University departments for use in essays and other forms of work.

What’s new in the 17th edition?

As well as a much more up-to-date look, the site has been enhanced with additional content. Of…

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Garret uncovers the map collection

Maps are an incredible tool in understanding the world. Vast swathes of land can be digested in a matter of minutes. Imagine how long it would take to describe every twist and turn of a border, every wind of a road, every village, town and city in the detail a map conveys. Their use stretches from education to governance, warfare to commerce. Hence for archives, maps provide a precious source by which we can investigate the past. Where were people making maps of? Who was making them and when? What type of map was it? All of these questions and more arise when studying maps.

The Cambridge African Studies Centre Library is lucky enough to possess a collection of around 250 such maps, which we are in the process of documenting and archiving. They range widely, including as diverse topics as tourist and military maps. Whilst a new gem in our collection, it certainly is a challenging one for a Centre more used to books and papers to deal with!

WP_20170801_03_10_15_Rich

As with most of our collection, there is a distinct colonial slant to the maps we possess. Whilst we don’t have records of who donated the maps, they almost all originate in various colonial offices, or as educational tools. Maps far more prevalent  in the late 19th and early 20th century. The many exploratory expeditions across the ‘undiscovered’ world – as with David Livingstone for instance – uncovered discoveries that demanded proper documentation. And those colonial officers who followed these first explorers documented the lands that they ruled. As such, there are many fascinating maps of Africa in our collection, of which we’ve picked out some our highlights of our archiving so far.

The first is a beautiful map produced by the government of Rhodesia, modern day Zambia, in 1964 which, claiming to be comprehensive, details all the journeys of Europeans in Rhodesia prior to 1890. What’s more, on the reverse is a full list of those Europeans who visited the area in that same timeframe, beginning as early as the 16th century with the first Portuguese explorers. It’s just a shame that this list would be obscured during the display of the map itself! The maps clear purpose is educational, but the focus on Europeans, to the exclusion of any mention of the natives, does add an additional layer of interest to the map. Having been printed in 1964, it seems plausible that it could have been used to legitimise the European presence in Rhodesia in the face of strong anti-colonial feeling, by emphasising the long European presence in the country. Whilst just conjecture, it is amongst the many interesting questions raised by these maps.

WP_20170801_04_21_32_Rich  WP_20170801_04_21_48_Rich  WP_20170801_04_22_02_Rich

Our collection has also been left various French maps made by the Institut Geographique National, including a set concerning Algeria made around 1962. Again, these maps are gorgeous (though that might just be me…), detailing the vast expanse of the Sahara, which is less empty than you might think! Their compilation during, and publication at the end of, the Algerian war, in which France reluctantly retreated, suggests that they did not plan well their withdrawal, with at least some government departments expecting to continue their presence in the country.

WP_20170801_03_18_50_Rich - Copy

Finally, we discovered several fascinating hand-drawn maps which detailed various land-disputes in the Gold Coast, modern day Ghana. These maps are mostly drawn up by a certain Ernest S. S. Woods of the 2nd Surveyors Brigade – an individual touch not often found in cartography. For colonial historians these documents provide an interesting perspective on Ghanaian compliance with, and possible use of, the British legal system. Furthermore, it gives an unflattering view of British justice, which is so often touted – however spuriously – as one of the greatest benefits of British rule. The document, which was signed off by Woods, the surveyor, in 1922, was then signed off by the court in 1928 – 6 years later! But the maps we have in our collection gives a sense of the scale of the task the British authorities faced – incredibly detailed and accurate maps had to be drawn up to resolve complex conflicts amongst their new subjects across vast areas.

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Maps were an important tool for the coloniser. They demarcated international boundaries – however arbitrary – surveyed lands for for governments based far away in Europe, and detailed natural resources to utilise – to give just a taster of all the flavours of maps we’ve found. With several large wads to go, be sure to check our Twitter feed for any other gems we uncover!

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Garret Shannon has kindly given his time to the African Studies Library before starting his degree at Durham in October

Reference and User Services Quarterly moves to OA

ejournals@cambridge

The Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) announces that its Reference and User Services Quarterly (RUSQ) journal will move to open access beginning with the fall 2017 issue.

RUSQ disseminates information of interest to reference librarians, information specialists and other professionals involved in user-oriented library services. The decision to move RUSQ from subscription based to open access was based on many factors, most notably the open access movement strongly supported by librarians. Other factors include ensuring a continued pool of strong authors and articles, ease of access for readers as well as broader worldwide access as the cost for professional journal subscriptions is extremely prohibitive.

“It is essential for RUSA to clearly live the values that we espouse as professionals; the move to open access is an important step in that direction,” states RUSQ Editor, Barry Trott. Read more about the transition from the editor in the first open access issue…

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New ebooks – July 2017

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a selection of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during July. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

Click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.

Education1   English1  9780415154963.indd  Crime & Empire AW  Art1  HPS1  Law1  Music1   Politics1  Psychology1  Sociology1    SPS1    Business1  Business2  Economics1  Education2  Education3  History2  Art2  Medicine1  Music2  Philosophy1  Psychology2  Sociology2  Sociology3   MML1  MML2    HPS2    Education4  Education5  Education6   HPS3  HPS4  HPS5  MML3  Psychology3

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The results are in!

 

Summer_Survey_2017_

 

The summer survey has drawn to a close, and we are incredibly happy with the constructive feedback that we have received.

I will be analysing the results shortly, and a further post will be created addressing the issues that our users have raised.

A huge thanks to all of you who took part, your opinions and ideas are invaluable!

 

The Adventure Doesn’t Stop Now.

I have been volunteering in the Centre of African Studies Library since November 2016. Today, this incredible experience comes to an end and I wanted to share with you what it felt like to be part of this great journey.

When I first started, last November, everything seemed brilliant. Today, I still have the same feeling and, while I am trying to do my retrospection, I am looking all around me, trying to remember all the details that have kept me happy for months. It can be a chair scraping the floor, the sound of a keyboard, or a book being moved. It’s raining and we can hear the wind – and I will miss all of that. I was happy to volunteer a few hours every week ; it was not a lot, it was not a huge amount of time, but it felt like home every time I went into the Library, and it will still feel like home even after I leave.

During these few months, I met Dr. Audrey Richards whilst I went through her pamphlet donations, and her own research papers. I met her a second time when Dr. Ray Abrahams came to talk about her, as a friend. And this experience was revealing about what you can learn, the two very different ways to get to know someone ; with her written works, I felt close to the professional, the anthropologist who will never be forgotten. By talking with Dr. Abrahams, I felt I was discovering the human being behind these interesting thoughts.

I am currently working on documents about race relations in South Africa, and I had to organise the documents into different boxes by subject area to find my way back to some kind of understanding. In this case, I found out a lot about politics, struggling people fighting for their rights, and social balance.  The feeling you get when you deal with political statements and documents such as these is powerful ; you know that these documents went through other hands. Fighting hands, revolutionary hands, and idealist hands. Sadly, I will not be able to finish my work – but I hope these feelings will be shared by the one who will complete this collection.

Even if leaving the Centre of African Studies Library makes me deeply melancholic, I am raring to start my Internship in Schlumberger Center of Research, because I am sure to earn useful skills that will lead me where I want, and need, to be.

I am so grateful for everything I know, everything I’ve learnt and discovered, and for the brilliant people I had the pleasure to meet. I am lucky to have been guided by someone exceptional, who gave me the taste of a profession and who, in many ways and with a fine honesty, made me stronger and ready to build my career path. Also, I believe that volunteering has been the most beautiful experience I’ve ever had : so go outside, give a helping hand because you might discover many attributes about yourself you didn’t even know were there in the first place.

This experience is over, but the adventure doesn’t stop now.

What about you ?

Ophélia Labardacq

Ophelia B&W july 2017