Trial access to Exact Editions

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access is now available to the magazine titles published by Exact Editionswhich comprise the entirety of the back issues online.  Access is available until 11 October 2017 at the following URL:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://www.exacteditions.com/iplogin

Mobile users can also download the ‘Exactly’ app on an iOS or Android device from the relevant app store, and instantly access every title.

Some of the titles Exact Editions features are described below.  They are quite mixed in terms of communities of interest, and range from the creative arts industries to contemporary politics and business, so please inform your users as you think appropriate.  A full list of the titles accessible in this trial can be examined in this sheet.

Please tell us about your impressions of this resource/the title(s) by writing to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Your feedback will inform whether or not we take this resource any further forward.  Thank you

Dazed & Confused

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Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Reports, 1941-1996 trial access

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access has been arranged to the Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Reports, 1941-1996 from 27 March – 25 April 2017.

Access is via the following URL:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://infoweb.newsbank.com

As the United States’ principal historical record of political open source intelligence for more than half a century, the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Report is an indispensable source for insights into decades of turbulent world history. The original mission of the FBIS was to monitor, record, transcribe and translate intercepted radio broadcasts from foreign governments, official news services, and clandestine broadcasts from occupied territories. Accordingly, it provides a wealth of information from all countries outside of the U.S.—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Please send your feedback on this trial to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you.

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Rand Daily Mail access for British Library readers

ejournals@cambridge

From the British Library web site:

The latest addition to the electronic newspaper resources available to British Library readers is one that we’re particularly pleased to have secured, the Rand Daily Mail. Published from 1902 to 1985, the South African daily newspaper was renowned for its anti-Apartheid stance, with notable coverage of the Sharpeville massacre, the Soweto uprising and the death of Steve Biko. Closed down in controversial circumstances in 1985, the entire newspaper is being digitised and made available by research materials service Readex. Happily the British Library is making the entire archive available for remote access to anyone with a Reader’s Pass.

Read further here:

http://blogs.bl.uk/thenewsroom/2017/03/rand-daily-mail.html

Helen Zille, Premier of the Western Cape, former journalist on the Rand Daily Mail and anti-apartheid activist.

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Rand Daily Mail trial access

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access has been arrange for the Rand Daily Mail 1902-1985

Access is available from the below URL on and off campus from now until March 29, 2017:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://infoweb.newsbank.com/apps/readex/welcome?p=HN-SARDM

Please send us your feedback on this trial – write to

ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk    Thank you

The Rand Daily Mail, a Johannesburg daily, is a critically important title that pioneered popular journalism in South Africa. It is renowned today for being the first newspaper to openly oppose apartheid and contribute to its downfall.   From its early beginnings in 1902, the Rand Daily Mail was known for its controversial yet courageous journalism. Despite significant pressure from the conservative government, its writers openly addressed issues that white readers knew little about.

Just now the issues loaded are for the period 1940-1985.  Issues for the period 1902-1939 are in production now at Readex and the entirety of the collection will be launched by April…

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BBC Monitoring

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access is now available to the BBC Monitoring portal.   This trial starts today and extends to 31 December 2016.

Access is via Shibboleth login both on and off campus.

Go to https://monitoring.bbc.co.uk/#/login

Click on the Login box

Click on “Login via Academic Institution”

Click on Cambridge

Please send your feedback to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.ukor tell your subject librarian what you think.

BBC Monitoring’s news and research services are based on round-the-clock monitoring of TV, radio, press, internet, news agency and social media sources by our analysts in the UK and worldwide. In total, Monitoring covers 180 countries, translates from over 100 languages and uses 2,800 local sources. As well as ‘real time’ reporting on unfolding stories, Monitoring utilises its deep cultural and linguistic understanding to provide detailed geo-political analysis. Current users include universities, research institutes and think tanks, government ministries, a number of UN agencies, as well as international organisations…

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Middle East & Africa Database and Eurasia Atlantic Database

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the Middle East & Africa Database and Eurasia Atlantic Database from the Reference Corporation up to 11 November 2016.

Access to the Middle East & Africa Database is at this link:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://mida.referencecorp.com/

Access to the Eurasia Atlantic Database is at this link:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://eura.referencecorp.com/

We want to know what you think of this resource.  Is it useful to you; if so, in what way?  Please send us your thoughts and feedback by writing an email to: ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you!

The Middle East and Africa Database is a bibliographic and fulltext database that provides area coverage (especially for political development, social development, foreign policy, economic development, investment, oil and petrochemicals, trade and technological industries) for the Middle East, North Africa, the Sahel and the Horn of Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Arabs, Iranians, Turks and Africans worldwide, including in Europe and North and…

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Electronic Legal Deposit and ebooks

ebooks@cambridge

Have you had trouble connecting to an ebook from iDiscover? Perhaps you have clicked on the ‘Online access’ link and waited for your ebook to open, only to get a ‘Connection timed out’ message some time after? If so, you have probably stumbled across an Electronic Legal Deposit ebook.

time-outWhat is Electronic Legal Deposit?

A growing number of publishers are now fulfilling their legal deposit obligations by depositing electronic rather than print books with the six legal deposit libraries, including the UL. Publishers currently doing this include, but are not limited to, Routledge, Edinburgh University Press, Palgrave Macmillan and Sage, and more are due to follow suit in the next few years.

How do Electronic Legal Deposit ebooks differ from purchased ebooks?

Ebooks that are deposited on Electronic Legal Deposit differ from ebooks purchased from publishers or aggregators (such as those bought by the ebooks@cambridge service or directly by Faculty…

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Factiva – searching for a specific article

Factiva tutorial – resources such as AllAfrica can be accessed via Factiva (further details available from the issue desk)

ejournals@cambridge

Factiva is a  business and news database of over 8,000 publications. Sources date from 1969 onwards and include full-text of many national and regional newspapers. Here is a quick guide on how to search for a specific article on this platform.

Example article: Salt, J. and Clarke, J. 2005. Migration matters. Prospect Magazine.

factiva-1-1

The search term in this case is “migration matters”.

Note that the default date range is usually set to “30 days” . You can change this to “all dates” using the dropdown list.

You can also choose the exact source you want to search by clicking on the blue triangle next to Source, which brings up a new search box. In this case you want to search the “Prospect Magazine”.

Finally, we suggest using the search button at the bottom right hand of the screen in order to see the full range of results. The…

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Taylor & Francis Online unveil new ejournal platform

ejournals@cambridge

Taylor & Francis have updated their ejournal platform at Taylor & Francis Online.

T&FO

The new search functionality highlights articles from within the Taylor & Francis collection as well as allowing searching by journal title.

Hem article T&FThe list of search results will include content which is available to members of the University of Cambridge amongst content to which we do not have subscriptions.

Content which is accessible off campus through Raven authentication, or on campus from a networked PC, can be identified by a green triangle containing a tick in the bottom right hand corner of the result screen record. If there is no tick then we do not have access to the article.

OA TFOpen access articles are indicated by an orange triangle with an open padlock at the bottom right hand side of the result screen records.

The refine options, on the left hand side of the results screen, offer…

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Simplifying the user experience for British Newspapers and Burney

ejournals@cambridge

From tomorrow, 7 July 2016, the British Newspapers 1600-1950 site, which enabled cross searching of the Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers and 17th and 18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers collections, will be retired and cross searching provided instead via the Artemis platform here:

http://gdc.galegroup.com/gdc/artemis?fromProdId=ECCO&p=GDCS&u=cambuni

The links in the eresources@cambridge A-Z and Cambridge LibGuides A-Z have been updated.

Nineteenth century British Library Newspapers and the 17th and 18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers continue to be provided as separate collections.

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