Rand Daily Mail trial access

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access has been arrange for the Rand Daily Mail 1902-1985

Access is available from the below URL on and off campus from now until March 29, 2017:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://infoweb.newsbank.com/apps/readex/welcome?p=HN-SARDM

Please send us your feedback on this trial – write to

ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk    Thank you

The Rand Daily Mail, a Johannesburg daily, is a critically important title that pioneered popular journalism in South Africa. It is renowned today for being the first newspaper to openly oppose apartheid and contribute to its downfall.   From its early beginnings in 1902, the Rand Daily Mail was known for its controversial yet courageous journalism. Despite significant pressure from the conservative government, its writers openly addressed issues that white readers knew little about.

Just now the issues loaded are for the period 1940-1985.  Issues for the period 1902-1939 are in production now at Readex and the entirety of the collection will be launched by April…

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Major newspaper archives – trial access

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access is now available until 20 March 2017 to historical newspaper archives :

Daily Mail – http://infotrac.galegroup.com/default/cambuni?db=DMHA

The Telegraph – http://infotrac.galegroup.com/default/cambuni?db=TGRH

Financial Times – http://infotrac.galegroup.com/default/cambuni?db=FTHA

British Library Newspapers (adding access to collections III, IV, V; the University currently has access to collections I and II) – http://infotrac.galegroup.com/default/cambuni?db=BNCN

Please note that all these collections are accessible through Gale (Artemis) Primary Sources:

http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/cambuni?db=GDC

Please send your feedback on these archives and what this access means to you to   ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk    Thank you.

MARRIED IN A COLLEGE CHAPEL. – For the first time for over two centuries a marriage was celebrated yesterday in the chapel of Trinity College, Cambridge.  The contracting parties were Miss Gertrude Maud Butler, daughter of Dr. H. Montagu Butler, the master of Trinity, and Mr. B. M. Fletcher, of Dorking.  The Bishop of Ely officiated.

Daily Mail (London, England),Thursday, December 19, 1901, Issue 1768, p.

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Factiva – searching for a specific article

Factiva tutorial – resources such as AllAfrica can be accessed via Factiva (further details available from the issue desk)

ejournals@cambridge

Factiva is a  business and news database of over 8,000 publications. Sources date from 1969 onwards and include full-text of many national and regional newspapers. Here is a quick guide on how to search for a specific article on this platform.

Example article: Salt, J. and Clarke, J. 2005. Migration matters. Prospect Magazine.

factiva-1-1

The search term in this case is “migration matters”.

Note that the default date range is usually set to “30 days” . You can change this to “all dates” using the dropdown list.

You can also choose the exact source you want to search by clicking on the blue triangle next to Source, which brings up a new search box. In this case you want to search the “Prospect Magazine”.

Finally, we suggest using the search button at the bottom right hand of the screen in order to see the full range of results. The…

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Simplifying the user experience for British Newspapers and Burney

ejournals@cambridge

From tomorrow, 7 July 2016, the British Newspapers 1600-1950 site, which enabled cross searching of the Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers and 17th and 18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers collections, will be retired and cross searching provided instead via the Artemis platform here:

http://gdc.galegroup.com/gdc/artemis?fromProdId=ECCO&p=GDCS&u=cambuni

The links in the eresources@cambridge A-Z and Cambridge LibGuides A-Z have been updated.

Nineteenth century British Library Newspapers and the 17th and 18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers continue to be provided as separate collections.

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